British cuisine entertainment, food, food and drink, history, lifestyle

Is the end nigh for our Great British staples?

I’m not entirely sure what it says about the Great British People, but the top  symbols of nationhood that make our chests swell with collective pride relate to food and drink.

 

First on the list of iconic delights is the inevitable Sunday roast, complete with meat and two veg, roast potatoes, and of course, Yorkshire pudding, said by many to be our national dish. Second is greasy takeaway staple fish and chips, followed by the BBC, the Union flag, Wimbledon and that most enduring of British cliches, the “nice cup of tea”.

 

So it was with shock that I learnt recently that sales of our national beverage are actually in decline – between 2010 and 2015, it seems, overall black tea volumes slumped by a huge 22% from 97 million kilograms to a mere 76 million. And according to market research agency Mintel, this outrage was attributable to one key thing – dwindling teabag purchases.

 

Sales of your bog-standard black teabag nosedived by 13% between 2012 and 2014 to £425 million as people such as myself forsook them with gay abandon for healthier, trendier – or, in my intolerance-scarred case, caffeine-free – alternatives ranging from green tea (sales up 50%), fruit and herb (up 31%) and speciality blends such as Earl Grey, Darjeeling and Assam (up 15%).

Nice cup of tea
Nice cup of tea

The increasing popularity of coffee, stimulated by premium-priced coffee shops springing up on every street corner – more than 20,000 such establishments now exist across the country, it seems – also didn’t help, of course, but did serve to create a market currently valued at more than £1 billion per annum.

 

Incidentally, coffee when first brought to Europe in the 16th century was apparently viewed with suspicion, being as it was the drink of choice in a Muslim world that Christendom had been at war with for centuries. On rather adventurously giving it a go though, Pope Clement VIII, under pressure from his advisors to declare it the “bitter invention of Satan”, is said to have stated: “This devil’s drink is so delicious…we should cheat the devil by baptizing it!”

 

And this ringing endorsement led to it it taking off all over the region pretty quickly after that. Europe’s first coffee house opened in Vienna in 1645, while the UK’s followed in Oxford seven years later – and still exists to this day under the name, The Grand Café.

 

Within as little as 25 years, some 3,000 or so such concerns had sprung up across the country, becoming popular places to meet and chat about the news, politics and gossip of the day – to such an extent, in fact, that Charles II tried unsuccessfully to get them banned in 1675 for being hotbeds of sedition. Unusually coffee shops were open to all men irrespective of their social status and so were associated with such dissolute notions as equality and republicanism, which obviously didn’t go down too well.

 

Anyway, even though the devil’s drink may once again be trying to assert its  fiendish grip on the nation, reassuringly according to the UK Tea and Infusions Association, black tea is still by far the country’s most popular hot drink. More than 165 million cups are imbibed every day compared to coffee’s mere 70 million.

In fact, more than half (54%) of the population drink at least one cup each day, with men aged between 16 and 44 being the biggest fans (four out of five indulge their vice on a daily basis). The only people that drink more of the stuff per head than us apparently are the Irish.

 

Great British bangers

 

Another staple that seems to be falling equally foul of the current migration to all things healthy, however, is the Great British Banger. According to the Office for National Statistics, the number of sausages sold has slumped by more than a quarter – or a huge 260 million packs – since 2008 – although the value of those sales has dropped by a mere 2.1% to £820.7 million.

 

The problem seems to lie in the fact that shoppers are now moving to healthier, non-processed meats such as chicken and steak, put off by reports of sausages’ high fat and salt content as well as the inclusion of cheap fillers such as breadcrumbs or wheat rusks.

 

But people also didn’t appear too keen on reports last June that the superbug MRSA had been found in sausages and minced pork sold in UK supermarkets. Or on last October’s revelations from the World Health Organisation that processed meat was a major cause of cancer – all of which, when taken together, has unsurprisingly done a fine job of hammering sales.

 

But it’s a shame in a way because sausages are, apparently, one of our oldest processed foods. A culinary gift from the Romans, their name is derived from the Latin word “salsus”, which means something salted.

 

Sausages
Sausages

They gained their nickname of “bangers’ during the First World War though, when food shortages led to a big reduction in meat levels. As a result, they were packed with scraps, cereal and water, which made them pop, hiss and even explode when cooked over open fires in the trenches.

 

But despite the sausage’s demotion in status in the national diet, thankfully all is not lost – last month, we were able to stand proud once more when the humble black pudding was dubbed a “superfood” by online health retailer, MuscleFood.com – and the word seemed to spread like wildfire.

 

Packed with protein, practically carb-free and rich in iron and zinc, the (pig’s) blood sausage and staple of the ever-popular full English breakfast was ranked among black beans, sprouted grains and kohlrabi (the new kale) in terms of health-giving properties.

 

Although various spoilsports have since burst the bubble by indiscreetly mentioning its high fat and salt content and equally high calorie count, that doesn’t seem to have put off sales of the Stornoway Black Pudding, for one. This particular titbit was awarded Protected Geographical Indication status in 2013, putting it on a similar footing to champagne in France and tea in Darjeeling.

 

As a result, Charles Macleod Butchers in Scotland’s Western Isles told the Mail that it had seen postal demand for its iconic delicacy jump eight-fold in the days after the story broke, and the expectation is that sales will as much as treble over the next five years on the back of it.

 

So despite ongoing fears of obesity epidemics, endless food and drink fads and all too frequent food scares, it seems that at least some of our Great British staples could triumph yet.

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British cuisine entertainment, export, food, import, leisure

Food, glorious British food

There’s nothing at the moment that’s quite able to rival “The Great British Bake Off” in terms of feel-good TV, as far as I can see.

The much-discussed cookery competition is all about artsy-craftsy creativity, good, wholesome rivalry and everyday, everyman-kind of contestants – even though most of us have nowhere near their level of amateur baking skill – courteously sparring for a place in the final.

It’s all very civilised and quintessentially British – you certainly couldn’t imagine it getting past programme commissioners anywhere else in the world. And it’s breathtakingly popular, pulling in an average audience this year of 12 million, up two million on 2014. Its success even means that it’s now in the process of being reworked for a US audience, albeit for a second time.

So the good-humoured Bake-Off, as it’s known to its fans, is thriving, pandering presumably to the nation’s collective nostalgia for cream teas. And our mutual need for a bit of light-hearted frippery in a world that can at times appear all too dark elsewhere – the programme was born, after all, in 2010 at the epicentre of the worst global recession since World War II, and at a time when we definitely all needed cheering up a bit.

But that’s not the only thing the reality TV show can be credited with – it’s also been acclaimed for spurring a huge resurgence in interest in home baking. A phenomenon that has led, among other things, to the omnipresence of cupcakes in British high street stores and the revival of such kitsch delights as multi-coloured china cake stands, a traditional bit of grandma’s crockery not so very long ago assigned to car boot sales.

cakestand

In fact, in the wake of the Bake Off phenomenon, the UK home baking industry has apparently leapt in value from a mere £523 million in 2009 to a vast £1.7 billion last year – with people spending £176 million each year on cooking chocolate, sprinkles and other decorative delights alone.

Even the Women’s Institute, with its reputation for Jam, Jerusalem and fabulous cakes, has benefited from this great culinary upsurge, with membership now at its highest levels since the 1970s.

Mixed foodie fortunes

But despite our current national obsession with foodie TV shows, celebrity chefs and aspirational cook books, it seems that cooking more mundane fare from scratch is actually on the wan – and has been for some time.

For instance, retail analysts Kantar Worldpanel pointed out a few years ago – and I can’t imagine things have changed much since – that members of the great British public, and especially those who are short of time, money or both, are spending larger chunks of their food budgets than ever on frozen and chilled ready meals – something that can’t be doing much for the nation’s collective waist-line in today’s age of obesity.

In fact, it seems the UK now has more amply-sized residents than anywhere else in Western Europe apart from Iceland and Malta, with 67% of men and 57% of women weighing our great land down rather more than they should, according to a recent study published in the Lancet medical journal.

As to how this translates into time spent slaving in the kitchen as opposed to sticking something in the microwave, the average time taken to prepare the main family meal has plummeted from 60 minutes two decades ago to around 32 minutes today. Which kind of says it all.

Moreover, the renaissance in restaurants serving British cuisine that we all heard so much about a few years ago now appears to have stalled, particularly outside of London.

P1010639

Instead, according to specialist food service market researchers Horizons, the average UK town centre is jam-packed full of Italian-style chains (25%) and curry houses – some 12,000 apparently, although a national shortage of chefs is currently raising fears that up to a third may have to close over the next few years due to the government’s controversial immigration cap. But British cuisine is way down on the list of favourites at a mere 9%, ranking lower than American food (12%) and only just ahead of Japanese and Mexican (6% respectively).

Surprisingly though, particularly given the unflattering reputation of British food abroad, it seems that our export trade in the stuff is booming. This apparent distaste for our hearty fare was incidentally cruelly but aptly encapsulated by former French president and prime minister Jacques Chirac at an international get-together in 2005 when he said: “One cannot trust people whose cuisine is so bad. The only thing they have ever done for European agriculture is mad cow disease”. Charming.

Food import and export

Anyway, in a sock in the eye for the now discredited Monsieur Chirac, the Institute of Export revealed earlier this year that the UK has now wangled its way into exporting culinary delicacies to a host of proud nations that are generally known for producing those very same foods domestically. So rather deliciously, this means selling huge amounts of tea to China, cheese to France (22,000 tonnes, in fact, Mr Chirac) and chocolate to Switzerland, to name but a few.

JacquesChirac

The entire sector is, as a result, now worth an eye-popping £19 billion a year and consists of as many as 2,500 companies selling their wares to 150 countries across the globe.

On the other hand and much less positively though, it appears that the country is playing fast and loose with its food security by relying on huge imports of fruit and veg from overseas that could just as easily be produced at home.

A report published earlier this year by the House of Commons’ Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee unveiled that the UK’s “self-sufficiency ratio” – which compares the amount of local food produced with levels of imported goods – has declined from a peak of nearly 87% in the early 1990s to a mere 68% in 2012, the last time figures were available.

In terms of fruit and veg that could be produced here, meanwhile, the ratio plummets still further to 12% and 58% respectively, with a huge £8 billion’s worth of goods being imported instead.

Which somewhat worryingly implies that, should the country hit trouble, whether that be as a result of conflict, pestilence or climate change-generated food shocks, we’re all likely to end up being scurvy-ridden. And vegans to boot due to the British livestock and dairy industries’ heavy reliance on imported soybean for animal feed from countries such as China, India and various parts of Africa.

All of which will, of course, make us even keener to watch Bake Off in order to cheer ourselves up and see exactly what it is we’re missing.

Britishness, leisure, tourism

What does “Britishness” really mean?

Eight months or so after returning to the UK following my two-year-long South African adventure, I decided to give myself a birthday treat and go back to blogging.

I’ve missed it. There’s something about putting your thoughts down on paper that makes you look at the world through slightly different, more observational, and perhaps rather more emblematic eyes. And, as I’m now back to being a freelance journalist full-time, I do find it eminently satisfying to write about the things that fascinate and amuse me rather than the things that pay the bills.

So what better topic to light upon than that of life in the UK in all its mundanity, its drollery and its singularity? Having been born and brought up in these Hallowed Isles, I am, of course, far from being the dispassionate observer of society, culture and everyday experiences that I was in South Africa. How could I be when I’m imbued with it all to the core?

But there are many ways to skin a cat, as the rather gruesome proverb goes. So my aim is to portray life here, for good or bad, through the prism of my own experiences for anyone who may be interested.

And what better place to start such a venture than with the vexed idea of “Britishness” and what it actually means. It’s an issue that people appear to have been wrestling with since the identity crisis brought on by the collapse of that doubled-edge sword, “the Great British Empire”, and the upheaval provoked by the Second World War – and with no satisfactory outcome to date.

Sure, lots of tired, old clichés still abound regarding our collective stiff-upper lip, our notions of fair play and our propensity to drink lots of tea. But that would scarcely seem enough to sum up a nation.

So it struck me as interesting when a friend of mine who’s into astrology informed me there’s a certain branch of the discipline that relates to countries. While astrology may not be everyone’s cup of tea, bear with me as the insights afforded are quite interesting – whether you hold any store by the influence of heavenly bodies or not.

Astrological_signs_by_J._D._Mylius

Apparently how it works is that, when drawing up a star chart, you plump for an historic date that could be seen as the birth of the nation. A common one for us Brits apparently is the coronation of William I in Westminster Abbey in London at noon on 25 December, 1066, following the Norman invasion.

Collective nature

This would mean that the UK has a Capricorn sun sign, with an Aries ascendant, the sun sign being the essence of who you are and the ascendant being how you present to other people.

Aries, so it’s said, is ruled by Mars, the planet of action, which means that people – or countries, for that matter – influenced by this sign tend to have a rather pioneering nature. They are also natural leaders, but can, on the downside, be aggressive, competitive and warlike. And they strive to be first in everything, sometimes to the point of ignoring the rights and feelings of others.

Sound familiar? Certainly notions of Empire would fit very nicely into many of the categories above, I’d have said, as would various ground-breaking events such as our creation of the first Parliament as well as sparking off the Industrial Revolution.

Capricorn-bonatti

The Capricorn side, meanwhile, is characterised by hard-working, practical, ambitious people (or countries) who are dedicated to achieving their goals and let nothing stand in their way. Responsible and methodical, they are often skilled administrators, hang onto established traditions and prefer slow, piecemeal reform to outright revolution.

So that’s where things like our cool British reserve and detachment would appear to come from as would the general focus on duty, and our apparently interminable love of Monarchy.

But my friend also believes that, given the liberal, eccentric and creative elements of our collective nature, the UK must likewise have a healthy dose of Aquarius thrown in there too – which I must confess is the bit that I’ve always tuned into most.

Along with just how feminine the energy of our country feels. I’d never noticed it before, but after going to Japan about 20 years ago for a dear friend’s wedding who is sadly no longer with us, it struck me just how immensely masculine that country was by way of contrast.

It wasn’t just the overt male domination going on all around or the seemingly diminuitive nature of the women, giggling behind their hands. It was just that the country felt so utterly and palpably male – I’d never experienced anything quite like it, and despite having an amazing time there, was really quite relieved to get back to our gentler, reassuringly female shores.

British birthdays

So anyway, just to tarry on the theme of Britishness a while longer, I had, due to the tender ministrations of my Beloved, a most appropriately British of birthdays.

Saffron_Walden_market_square

After indulging in that childhood classic of fishfinger sandwich, complete with very adult tartare sauce, at the Old English Gentleman pub in the charming, old market town of Saffron Walden in north Essex where we live, the next step was to take ourselves off to the historic city of Cambridge for a lovely roam around.

After working up a suitable appetite with our wanderings, we then treated ourselves to the traditional British fare on offer at The Cambridge Chop House opposite King’s College in the heart of town.

For those who aren’t familiar with chop houses, they, like coffee houses, alehouses and boarding houses, are essentially great British institutions of hundreds of years standing.

Originally, male-only establishments, they actually date back to the start of modern commercial trading in the country during the sixteenth and seventeenth century. Businessmen would gather there to hatch deals over hearty plates of traditionally cooked meat such as the chops after which they’re named, all washed down with a fine selection of local ales.

Even in the face of the new-fangled European cuisine sweeping across from the continent at the apex of their popularity in the 19th century, the chop houses, it seems, still managed to cling to their resolutely British mores.

So in keeping with the spirit of the occasion and despite not being a huge red-meat fan, I opted for herb-encrusted lamb chops while my Beloved went for a 10oz Tail on Rib Eye steak – whatever that means. And excellent they were too – traditional British food at its best.

Our final and ultimate indulgence then was an evening watching Shakespeare’s Macbeth in pergola-bedecked gardens near King’s. So all in all, a more British birthday couldn’t have been had if we’d tried.

So good day UK – it’s great to be back.